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It’s getting warmer outside! With the summer season fast approaching, many of us find ourselves spending a lot more time outside. Whether you’re biking to work, going on a hike, relaxing at the beach, or simply enjoying nature, outdoor activities are taking hold. While it is important to keep active and take advantage of the beautiful weather, we should not forget to stay safe under
By Allison MacAlister CCSN Communications & Social Media Coordinator On March 6th 2018, the DNA test company 23andMe announced that it now has approval to tell customers of their mail-in DNA-testing kit about three gene mutations of BRCA1 and BRCA2 as part of their genetic health results. What does that mean, and is it worth being concerned about? Let’s talk about the facts. Gene mutations?
By Jaymee Maaghop CCSN Public Policy Assistant In a report released in 2017, it was found that one in every two Canadians will be diagnosed with cancer in their lifetime. This report was released by the Canadian Cancer Society (CCS) in partnership with the Public Health Agency of Canada and Statistics Canada. With advancements in cancer control such as prevention, early detection and treatment, the
by Eileen Dahl A snowy day, mid-December, 2015, I was sitting in my car. The receptionist at my family doctor’s office had called to let me know that the results of yesterday’s bone scan were in and I needed to come in to discuss them. I asked if I should bring someone with me for the appointment. She said yes and my heart sank. I
  Donate today at CanadaHelps! On #GivingTuesday, you showed us that you wanted to help make a difference in the lives of patients, survivors and their families through providing educational webinars on our website & working diligently to give survivors a voice at the board table through our Seat the the Table program. This holiday season, we continue to ask your assistance in pursuing our
According to Lung Cancer Canada, lung cancer accounts for 27% of all cancer deaths, and yet it receives only 7% of research funding. In fact, lung cancer kills more Canadians than breast cancer, cervical cancer, uterine cancer and ovarian cancer, combined. It’s by far the most deadly cancer, yet it fails to attract the attention or research funding that should accompany its impact. The goal