Immunotherapy: The promise of a new era in cancer treatment

By Marina Canalejo CCSN Web Policy Assistant When you hear the word immunotherapy what comes to mind?  An obscure therapy of some sort that has not yet been very well explained? In this article, you will find out about the immune system, how it works and how these new immunotherapies are helping our own bodies attack and kill cancer wherever it might be. The immune

CCSN Meets with Ottawa Mayor, Jim Watson

On June 7, 2017, members of the Canadian Cancer Survivor Network and Prostate Cancer Canada Network Ottawa met with Jim Watson, Mayor of the City of Ottawa. It was a beautiful day at City Hall to receive the Mayor’s official proclamation declaring June as National Cancer Survivors Month in Ottawa. CCSN’s President and CEO Jackie Manthorne posed with the Mayor as he read the proclamation,

PEI Becomes Latest Province to Sign New Healthcare Agreement

Last week, Prince Edward Island agreed to a new healthcare accord with the federal government, securing an additional $45.1 million over the next ten years. British Columbia, Alberta, Manitoba, Ontario and Quebec still remain without a new agreement. When asked about the new accord, federal Health Minister Jane Philpott stated, “They’ve got some great plans there [Prince Edward Island] about how they want to make

NT, NU, YT and SK ink new deal with Feds

In the last couple of days, three territorial governments as well as one provincial government have signed separate, bilateral healthcare agreements with the federal government. The Northwest Territories, Nunavut, Yukon and Saskatchewan join New Brunswick, Nova Scotia and Newfoundland and Labrador as provinces/territories who have signed separate deals in the past month. The breakdowns for the new agreements are: Northwest Territories will receive $7.4 million

NB, NS and Newfoundland & Labrador Sign Agreements

Before the holidays, we shared a blog titled “Federal andprovincial governments clash about healthcare funding.” Since then, certain parties have made significant moves which could ultimately affect all Canadians. Since our original post, three of the four Atlantic provinces have signed separate, bilateral healthcare agreements with the federal government. New Brunswick was the first province to move forward with its own healthcare deal on December