Caregivers

The Canadian Cancer Society (CCS) says:

‘If you’re feeling pressured into becoming a caregiver, it’s best to be honest about how you feel. Respect and speak up for your own feelings, needs and desires, as well as those of your loved one. Decide your limits and let others know so that both you and your loved one get the help you need. It’s normal to be uncomfortable with the idea of giving medicines, giving physical care (such as helping your loved one to the bathroom) or maybe you’re worried about juggling the responsibilities you already have at home or work with this new role. If you talk about it, you can usually work something out. The healthcare team can provide lots of guidance on medicine, or maybe someone else can act as the main caregiver or share the responsibilities with you.’ [1]

Advancing Collective Priorities: A Canadian Carer Strategy – This report captures the results of a pan-Canadian environmental scan of supports and resources for Canada’s carers/caregivers. Funded by the Canadian Partnership Against Cancer, the report was produced by the Canadian Cancer Action Network, the Canadian Home Care Association and Carers of Canada.

How I learned to be a cancer caregiver

Other Caregiving Resources

Mental health

Cancer care – Caregiving for your loved one with cancer – An online booklet filled with tips from professional oncology social workers from CancerCare.

National cancer institute – Care for the caregiver – A self-care booklet for caregivers of cancer patients.

References

[1] “If You’re a Caregiver.” Canadian Cancer Society. Canadian Cancer Society, 2014. Web. accessed 26 May 2014.