Detecting cancer gene mutations from home: What you need to know

By Allison MacAlister CCSN Communications & Social Media Coordinator On March 6th 2018, the DNA test company 23andMe announced that it now has approval to tell customers of their mail-in DNA-testing kit about three gene mutations of BRCA1 and BRCA2 as part of their genetic health results. What does that mean, and is it worth

What is Cancer Rehabilitation? Part One

By Jaymee Maaghop CCSN Public Policy Assistant In a report released in 2017, it was found that one in every two Canadians will be diagnosed with cancer in their lifetime. This report was released by the Canadian Cancer Society (CCS) in partnership with the Public Health Agency of Canada and Statistics Canada. With advancements in

Just Breathe: Learning to Live with Bone Mets

by Eileen Dahl A snowy day, mid-December, 2015, I was sitting in my car. The receptionist at my family doctor’s office had called to let me know that the results of yesterday’s bone scan were in and I needed to come in to discuss them. I asked if I should bring someone with me for

Lung Cancer Awareness Month: A Time to Change Our Thinking

According to Lung Cancer Canada, lung cancer accounts for 27% of all cancer deaths, and yet it receives only 7% of research funding. In fact, lung cancer kills more Canadians than breast cancer, cervical cancer, uterine cancer and ovarian cancer, combined. It’s by far the most deadly cancer, yet it fails to attract the attention

Happy Father’s Day

The Canadian Cancer Survivor Network would like to wish a very Happy Father’s Day to all fathers and father figures, especially those who have been diagnosed or are living with cancer. Fathers and father figures play a very important role in the lives of everyone around them, and can be an amazing support system to

Happy Mother’s Day

A mother can be a lot of things. A mother can be the one that gives you a hug, right after you hear your cancer diagnosis. A mother is the woman at the grocery store with two young children, who’s dealing with her metastatic breast cancer. A mother can be a person who just found